Defense Against Crime

05/02/2019

20 Things You Should Know About Teen Dating Violence


February is Teen Dating Violence Awareness Month

The tragic crime of domestic violence in the United States is often unacknowledged by the public face that our society wears. Behind smiling, couples and seemingly carefree children lurk something that many thoughts was better left unspoken.  While the discussion of domestic violence happens much more often today, bringing light to this terrible crime that makes a home a prison, abuse still occurs, and, often, the children adopt these destructive behavioral patterns both as victims and aggressors

The shocking numbers

  • Annually one in four teens reports verbal, physical, and emotional or sexual abuse.
  • Almost one in five teens reports being a victim of emotional abuse.
  • Almost one in five high school age girls has been physically or sexually abused by their dating partner.
  • One of five college females will experience some form of dating violence.
  • A survey of adolescent and college students revealed that date rape accounted for 67% of sexual assaults.
  • Dating violence among fellow teens is reported by about 54% of high school students.
  • One in three teens reports knowing someone who has been physically hurt by his or her partner through violent actions which included hitting, punching, kicking, slapping, and/or choking.
  • Nearly 80% of teens believe verbal abuse is a serious issue for their age group.
  • Nearly 80% of girls who have been victims of physical abuse in their dating relationships continue to date the abuser.
  • Nearly 20% of teen girls who have been in a relationship said that their boyfriend had threatened violence or self-harm in the event of a break-up.
  • Nearly 70% of young women who have been raped knew their rapist; the perpetrator was or had been a boyfriend, friend, or casual acquaintance.
  • The majority of teen dating abuse occurs in the home of one of the partners.
  • About one in three high school students have been or will be involved in an abusive relationship.
  • Forty percent of teenage girls ages 14 to 17 say they know someone their age that has been hit or beaten by a boyfriend.
  • Most abused teens NEVER tell their parents.
  • In one study, from 30% to 50% of female high school students reported having already experienced teen dating violence.
  • In one particular year, 7% percent of all murder victims were young women who were killed by their boyfriends.
  • A survey of 500 young women, ages 15 to 24, found that 60% were currently involved in an ongoing abusive relationship and all participants had experienced violence in a dating relationship.
  • One study found that 38% of date rape victims were young women from 14 to 17 years of age.
  • It is estimated that between 20% to 52% of high school and college age dating couples have engaged in physical abuse.

The sources of these facts come from the U.S. Department of Justice, Bureau of Justice Statistics, National Center for Victims of Crime Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), Maternal and Child Health Bureau, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), and other studies.

 See Also February is Teen Dating Violence Awareness Month

 

PepperEyes.com is dedicated to providing you with the best and most affordable personal protection products on the market to meet the security needs of you, your family members or your business, by assisting anyone who is unwilling to become a victim of crime.  If you want to take personal responsibility for yourself, your home or your business, buy our high quality discount personal protection products and arm yourself with the knowledge of the best way to stay secure in an ever-increasing violent world. In today’s society being equipped mentally and physically is no longer an Option. Victor Swindell

08/02/2011

Teen Dating Violence Facts!


Did you know …. 

  • Teen dating violence runs across all races, genders, and socioeconomic lines. Both males and females are victims, but boys and girls are abusive in different ways:
    • Girls are more likely to yell, threaten to hurt themselves, pinch, slap, scratch, or kick;
    • Boys physically injure girls more severely and frequently;
    • Some teen victims experience violence occasionally;
    • Others are abused more often…sometimes daily.
  • Forty percent of teenage girls ages 14 to 17 say they know someone their age who has been hit or beaten by a boyfriend.
  • A comparison study of Intimate Partner Violence rates between those of teens and those of adults show that teens are at higher risk of intimate partner abuse.
  • More than half young women raped (68 percent) knew their rapist either as a boyfriend, friend or casual acquaintance.
  • Statistics indicates that Females ages 16-24 are more vulnerable to intimate partner violence than any other age group at a rate almost triple the national average.
  • Approximately 1 in 5 female high school students reported being physically and/or sexually abused by a their dating partner.
    About one in three high school students have been or will be involved in an abusive relationship.
  • Among female victims of intimate partner violence, a current or former boyfriend or girlfriend victimized 94% of those between the ages of 16-19.

  • Between 1993 and 1999, 22% of all homicides against females ages 16-19 were committed by an intimate partner.
  • In a study of gay, lesbian, and bisexual adolescents, youths involved in same-sex dating are just as likely to experience dating violence as youths involved in opposite sex dating.
  • Nearly one-half of adult sex offenders report committing their first sexual offenses prior to the age of 18.
    One in five or 20 percent of dating couples report some type of violence in their relationship.
  • One of five college females will experience some form of dating violence.

  • 58% of rape victims report being raped between the ages of 12-24.
  • Half of the reported date rapes occur among teenagers.
  • Intimate partner violence among adolescents is associated with increased risk of substance use, unhealthy weight control behaviors, sexual risk behaviors, pregnancy, and suicide.

 

The sources of these facts come from the U.S. Department of Justice, Bureau of Justice Statistics, National Center for Victims of Crime Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), Maternal and Child Health Bureau, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), and other studies.

 

See Also February is Teen Dating Violence Awareness Month

  

PepperEyes.com is dedicated to providing you with the best and most affordable personal protection products on the market to meet the security needs of you, your family members or your business, by assisting anyone who is unwilling to become a victim of crime.  If you want to take personal responsibility for yourself, your home or your business, buy our high quality discount personal protection products and arm yourself with the knowledge of the best way to stay secure in an ever-increasing violent world. In today’s society being equipped mentally and physically is no longer an option 


 

01/02/2011

February is Teen Dating Violence Awareness Month


What’s Teen Dating Violence Awareness Month?

 Like Chris Brown and Rhianna, there are many stories in the news about couples experiencing dating abuse.

  • Every year approximately one in four adolescents reports verbal, physical, emotional or sexual abuse.

  • One in five teens in a serious relationship reports having been hit, slapped, or pushed by a partner.

  • Teen dating violence runs across race, gender, and socioeconomic lines. Both males and females are victims, but boys and girls are abusive in different ways:

    • Girls are more likely to yell, threaten to hurt themselves, pinch, slap, scratch, or kick;

    • Boys injure girls more severely and frequently;

    • Some teen victims experience violence occasionally;

    • Others are abused more often…sometimes daily.
      “Teen Victim Project,” National Center for Victims of Crime, http://www.ncvc.org/tvp, (Last visited 10/5/04).

Teen Dating Violence Prevention and Awareness Month is a national effort during the month of February to raise awareness about abuse in youth relationships and promote programs that prevent it.

The effects of teen dating violence are impossible to ignore – they hurt not just the young people victimized but also their families, friends, schools and communities. Throughout the month of February, organizations and individuals nationwide are coming together to highlight the need to educate young people about healthy relationships, teach healthy relationship skills and how to prevent or escape the devastating cycle of abuse.

The History of Teen DATING VIOLENCE Month

The Teen Dating Violence Awareness and Prevention Initiative was spearheaded by teenagers across the nation who chose to take a stand and put a end to teen dating violence. In 2005, the importance of addressing teen dating violence was highlighted by its inclusion in the reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act.

 Now supported by dozens of national, state and local organizations, the call to end teen dating violence was formally recognized by Congress in 2006. At that time, both Houses of Congress declared the first full week in February “National Teen Dating Violence Awareness and Prevention Week.”

The following year, Congress followed the lead of dozens of national, state and local organizations in sounding the call to end teen dating violence. Both Chambers of congress declared the first full week in February “National Teen Dating Violence Prevention and Awareness Week.” Then in 2010, Congress began dedicating the entire month of February to teen dating violence awareness and prevention.

Now in its second year, Teen DATING VIOLENCE Month is celebrated by leaders in government, student bodies, schools, youth service providers, community-based organizations, parents and more.

Join us in promoting awareness of and preventing teen dating violence.

Getting Help

  •  National Teen Dating Abuse Helpline | 1-866-331-9474 | 1-866-331-8453 TTY |
  • Dating Violence Resource Center
  • Girls Incorporated National Resource Center is a national youth organization dedicated to inspiring all girls to be strong, smart and bold. 441 West Michigan Street, Indianapolis, IN 46202 Phone: 317-634-7546 Fax: 317-634-3024 Email: girlsinc@girls-inc.org Website: www.girlsinc.org
  • National Coalition Against Domestic Violence (NCADV) is dedicated to the empowerment of battered women and their children and therefore is committed to the elimination of personal and societal violence in the lives of battered women and their children. Teen Dating Violence Project, PO Box 18749, Denver, CO 80218 Phone: 303-839-1852 Fax: 303-831-9251 Website: http://www.ncadv.org
  • Rape Abuse Incest National Network. (RAINN), 24 Hours: 1-800-656-HOPE – The Rape, Abuse, Incest National Network will automatically transfer the caller to the nearest rape crisis center, anywhere in the nation. It can be used as a last resort if people cannot find domestic violence shelter.
  • National Hopeline Network 24 hours, 1-800-SUICIDE (784-2433). The National Hopeline Network provides suicide crisis and domestic violence service referrals for teens. Callers are automatically routed to the closest certified crisis center
  • You can also check to see what resources your local YMCA has to offer.

 PepperEyes.com is dedicated to providing you with the best and most affordable personal protection products on the market to meet the security needs of you, your family members or your business, by assisting anyone who is unwilling to become a victim of crime.  If you want to take personal responsibility for yourself, your home or your business, buy our high quality discount personal protection products and arm yourself with the knowledge of the best way to stay secure in an ever-increasing violent world. In today’s society being equipped mentally and physically is no longer an option. 

Blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: