Defense Against Crime

11/03/2009

Just Who is Watching YOUR CHILDREN?

Chester Arthur Stiles Found Guilty
Chester Arthur Stiles Found Guilty

In Las Vegas, A man who was tracked down after a video of him sexually assaulting a 2-year-old girl was found in the Nevada desert was convicted Tuesday of that attack and another on a 6-year-old. Chester Arthur Stiles remained sitting, showed no emotion and stared straight ahead as guilty verdicts were read against him for 22 felonies, including sexual assault. He faces multiple life prison terms at sentencing, which was set for May 8.

Stiles, 38, of Las Vegas, was arrested after he was identified as the man on the video and a fugitive in a case involving a 6-year-old girl. Prosecutors said he molested the older child in late 2003. Stiles was convicted of 10 counts of lewdness with a child under the age of 14, 11 counts of sexual assault with a minor under 14, and one count of attempted sexual assault with a minor under 14. Three charges stemmed from allegations that Stiles molested the 6-year-old while he and his girlfriend spent two nights as guests at the girl’s Las Vegas home in December 2003.

That encounter was not videotaped. But the girl, now 11 and living in Washington state, testified that she awoke before dawn one morning with Stiles kneeling next to her bed and fondling her. Stiles also faces federal charges of producing child pornography, which could carry a sentence of 15 to 30 years in federal prison. That trial is set for April 6 in Las Vegas.

A few days ago I heard the Georgia is one of the few  that is trying to address  Child Sex Trafficking. The people perpetrating this crime can be some of the same men, and women who work with you, who sit in church with you, or who you see in professional buildings.  How well do you know the person who is watching your children?  What are they doing when your not around?  Did you every think of investing in a Nanny Cam?

The statistics are shocking

  • 1 in 4 girls is sexually abused before the age of 18. (96)
  • 1 in 6 boys is sexually abused before the age of 18. (96)
  • 1 in 5 children are solicited sexually while on the internet. (30, 87)
  • Nearly 70% of all reported sexual assaults (including assaults on adults) occur to children ages 17 and under. (76)
  • An estimated 39 million survivors of childhood sexual abuse exist in America today. (1)

Even within the walls of their own homes, children are at risk for sexual abuse

  • 30-40% of victims are abused by a family member. (2, 44, 76)
  • Another 50% are abused by someone outside of the family whom they know and trust.
  • Approximately 40% are abused by older or larger children whom they know. (1, 44)
  • Therefore, only 10% are abused by strangers.

Sexual abuse can occur at all ages, probably younger than you think

  • The median age for reported abuse is 9 years old. (64)
  • More than 20% of children are sexually abused before the age of 8. (76)
  • Nearly 50% of all victims of forcible sodomy, sexual assault with an object, and forcible fondling are children under 12. (74, 76)

Most children don’t tell even if they have been asked

  • Evidence that a child has been sexually abused is not always obvious, and many children do not report that they have been abused.
  • Over 30% of victims never disclose the experience to ANYONE.
  • Young victims may not recognize their victimization as sexual abuse.
  • Almost 80% initially deny abuse or are tentative in disclosing. Of those who do disclose, approximately 75% disclose accidentally. Additionally, of those who do disclose, more than 20% eventually recant even though the abuse occurred.
  • Fabricated sexual abuse reports constitute only 1% to 4% of all reported cases. Of these reports, 75% are falsely reported by adults and 25% are reported by children. Children only fabricate ½% of the time.

Consequences of child sexual abuse begin affecting children and families immediately. They also affect society in innumerable and negative ways. These effects can continue throughout the life of the survivor so the impact on society for just one survivor continues over multiple decades. Try to imagine the impact of 39 million survivors.

Health and/or Behavioral Problems:

  • The way a victim’s family responds to abuse plays an important role in how the incident affects the victim.
  • Sexually abused children who keep it a secret or who “tell” and are not believed are at greater risk than the general population for psychological, emotional, social, and physical problems often lasting into adulthood.
  • Children who have been victims of sexual abuse are more likely to experience physical health problems (e.g., headaches).
  • Victims of child sexual abuse report more symptoms of PTSD, more sadness, and more school problems than non-victims. (10, 16, 55, 72)
  • Victims of child sexual abuse are more likely to experience major depressive disorder as adults. (55, 72)
  • Young girls who are sexually abused are more likely to develop eating disorders as adolescents. (16, 40, 89)
  • Adolescent victims of violent crime have difficulty in the transition to adulthood, are more likely to suffer financial failure and physical injury, and are at risk to fail in other areas due to problem behaviors and outcomes of the victimization.

Drug and/or Alcohol Problems:

  • Victims of child sexual abuse report more substance abuse problems. 70-80% of sexual abuse survivors report excessive drug and alcohol use. (10, 16, 89)
  • Young girls who are sexually abused are 3 times more likely to develop psychiatric disorders or alcohol and drug abuse in adulthood, than girls who are not sexually abused. (16, 40, 89)
  • Among male survivors, more than 70% seek psychological treatment for issues such as substance abuse, suicidal thoughts and attempted suicide. Males who have been sexually abused are more likely to violently victimize others. (90)

Teenage Pregnancy and Promiscuity:

  • Children who have been victims of sexual abuse exhibit long-term and more frequent behavioral problems, particularly inappropriate sexual behaviors.
  • Women who report childhood rape are 3 times more likely to become pregnant before age 18.
  • An estimated 60% of teen first pregnancies are preceded by experiences of molestation, rape, or attempted rape. The average age of their offenders is 27 years.
  • Victims of child sexual abuse are more likely to be sexually promiscuous. (39, 59, 60, 70)
  • More than 75% of teenage prostitutes have been sexually abused.

Crime:

  • Adolescents who suffer violent victimization are at risk for being victims or perpetrators of felony assault, domestic violence, and property offense as adults.
  • Nearly 50% of women in prison state that they were abused as children.
  • Over 75% of serial rapists report they were sexually abused as youngsters.

Most perpetrators don’t molest only one child if they are not reported and stopped.

  • Nearly 70% of child sex offenders have between 1 and 9 victims; at least 20% have 10 to 40 victims. (23)
  • An average serial child molester may have as many as 400 victims in his lifetime.

 

 

Don’t be their Next Victim

 

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2 Comments

  1. MYRTLE BEACH, SC (WMBF) – The father of a 5-month-old pleaded with the court Wednesday to sentence her nanny to jail time, saying Cheryl Ann White is a predator.

    Cheryl Ann White, 62, pleaded guilty Wednesday morning to assault and battery of a high and aggravated nature and unlawful neglect toward a child.

    The baby’s father, Wesley Locklair pleaded with the court to give White active jail time, saying his daughter is a victim that “can’t speak for herself.” Locklair, a criminal defense attorney, called White a predator and equated her actions to assault with intent to kill.

    Judge Larry Hyman told the court he believes the entire situation to be bizarre, and noted that while he thought White handled the infant roughly, there were no bruises or signs of abuse during the 10 weeks she was in her care.

    White was able to speak to court after entering her plea and said she truly cared for the baby. Hyman said he thought White was being truthful, and was torn over how to sentence her.

    Hyman sentenced White to 10 years suspended sentence with five years probation on both counts.

    White was accused of abusing the 5-month-old girl in February 2008. Leslie and Wesley Locklair said a hidden camera caught White jerking the baby by her legs and shaking her.

    Leslie Locklair testified in court Tuesday that White worked for them for 10 weeks, and the infant would cry when White came over. When she would return home from work, the mother said the baby would be in wet diapers and stopped eating while in White’s care.

    The couple said they received a security camera at a baby shower, and on Feb. 26, 2008, saw the video showing the abuse.

    Jury selection was Monday, and trial began yesterday. The prosecution rested their case after the first day of trial.

    Like

    Comment by Victor Swindell — 09/04/2009 @ 12:37 PM

  2. I was abducted, beaten and raped by a stranger. It wasn’t a neighbor, a coach, a relative, a family friend or teacher. It was a recidivist pedophile predator who spent time in prison for previous sex crimes; an animal hunting for victims in the suburban neighborhoods of Lincoln, Rhode Island.

    I was able to identify the guy and the car he was driving. Although he was arrested and indicted, he never went to trial. His trial never took place because he was brutally beaten to death in Providence before his court date. 34 years later, no one has ever been charged with the crime.

    In the time between the night of my assault and the night he was murdered, I lived in fear. I was afraid he was still around town. Afraid he was looking for me. Afraid he would track me down and kill me. The fear didn’t go away when he was murdered. Although he was no longer a threat, the simple life and innocence of a 14-year-old boy was gone forever. Carefree childhood thoughts replaced with the unrelenting realization that my world wasn’t a safe place. My peace shattered by a horrific criminal act of sexual violence.

    Over the past 34 years, I’ve been haunted by horrible, recurring memories of what he did to me. He visits me in my sleep. There have been dreams–nightmares actually–dozens of them, sweat inducing, yelling-in-my-sleep nightmares filled with images and emotions as real as they were when it actually happened. It doesn’t get easier over time. Long dead, he still visits me, silently sneaking up from out of nowhere when I least expect it. From the grave, he sits by my side on the couch every time the evening news reports a child abduction or sex crime. I don’t watch America’s Most Wanted or Law and Order, because the stories are a catalyst, triggering long suppressed emotions, feelings, memories, fear and horror. Real life horror stories rip painful suppressed memories out from where they hide, from that recessed place in my brain that stores dark, dangerous, horrible memories. It happened when William Bonin confessed to abducting, raping and murdering 14 boys in California; when Jesse Timmendequas raped and murdered Megan Kanka in New Jersey; when Ben Ownby, missing for four days, and Shawn Hornbeck, missing for four years, were recovered in Missouri.

    Despite what happened that night and the constant reminders that continue to haunt me years later, I wouldn’t change what happened. The animal that attacked me was a serial predator, a violent pedophile trolling my neighborhood in Lincoln, Rhode Island looking for young boys. He beat me, raped me, and I stayed alive. I lived to see him arrested, indicted and murdered. It might not have turned out this way if he had grabbed one of my friends or another kid from my neighborhood. Perhaps he’d still be alive. Perhaps there would be dozens of more victims and perhaps he would have progressed to the point of silencing his victims by murdering them.

    Out of fear, shame and guilt, I’ve been silent for over three decades, not sharing with anyone the story of what happened to me. No more. The silence has to end. The fear, the shame, the guilt have to go. It’s time to stop keeping this secret from the people closest to me, people I care about, people I love, my long-time friends and my family. It’s time to speak out to raise public awareness of male sexual assault, to let other victims know that they’re not alone and to help victims of rape and violent crime understand that the emotion, fear and memories that may still haunt them are not uncommon to those of us who have shared a similar experience. For those who suffer in silence, I hope my story brings strenth, comfort, peace and hope.

    My novel, Men in My Town, is based on my abduction, beating and assault and the unsolved brutal murder of the man who attacked me. Men in My Town is available now at Amazon.com. For insight into Men in My Town, please visit the Men in My Town blog at http://www.meninmytown.wordpress.com

    Like

    Comment by Keith Smith — 31/05/2009 @ 10:50 PM


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